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Search Results 65 to 92 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)
at this, and we couldn't agree more that is the root of the problem. you can't change the tax cold, free trailed, the deregulation issues, you can't change the whole issue of debt financing and all that until we figure out a way to get beyond the influence of the money in politics. >> guest: and this is not easy. and it may not even be possible now that the supreme court has deemed money an exercise of free speech. and that really raises the bar on this. and it just means anything goes from here on out. >> host: v betweens in to you, ge are the people to event and understand the true amount of what the government spends? where is their accessible, understandable data? >> guest: there's really a lot of data out there. i don't think it's a shortage of data. the problem, as always, is a matter of analyzing it, seeing what's there. i mean, one of the stories out there now that we both found disturbing, there's one whole story out there that social security is in some sort of immediate trouble and that somehow the bookkeeping is not proper. this is totally bogus in our mind. will social secur
chance we'll see this president even say the words "carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> ...and a distinctly satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. >> like some sort of genius. >> yes, except for the genius part. >> stephanie: it is the "the stephanie miller show." 34 -- okay minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-12. [ laughter ] >> wow. >> stephanie: when did you put that help ticket in? >> wednesday. >> 1972. >> stephanie: okay. 1-800-steph-12 the phone number toll free from anywhere. looky who's back in town. ♪ ♪ pundit ♪ ♪ papa, papa, papa who ♪ >> >> stephanie: thank god you picked a slow news week. >> go to berlin. >> it was so nice not to be there to watch the freakout. >> stephanie: the arkansas lawmaker mocks boston liberal says they wish they had assault rifles. if there has ever been an example on the expertise of law enforcement, it was boston, right? >> right. it was exactly what they
on a smaller tax base, and, arguably, less affluent communities. man: sewickley township is a rural farming community, however, herminie itself would be considered to be the downtown area of the township. it's the agways, the auto-parts store, the bank. it's your typical small-town village. man: people think that rural areas are pristine and perfect and everybody has a nice, simple life. that's, uh, not exactly the situation here. when you come into town in the summer, you know you're coming to herminie. woman: the aroma in 90-degree days... can sometimes just want to knock you over. woman: we have water. we have power, we have gas, but we have no sewage. i guess when they laid out the town years ago, it just all went into the pipes and straight into the "crick." sabljak: i've lived here 43 years in the same house. when i moved here, they told us that sewage would be here shortly. and here it is 43 years later and we still don't have it. my husband and i went to the first meeting. he always said, "boy, i'll never see it in my lifetime." well... my husband passed away last december. man: rig
-- reviews you can trust. welcnew york state, where cutting taxes for families and businesses is our business. we've reduced taxes and lowered costs to save businesses more than two billion dollars to grow jobs, cut middle class income taxes to the lowest rate in sixty years, and we're creating tax free zones for business startups. the new new york is working creating tens of thousands of new businesses, and we're just getting started. to grow or start your business visit thenewny.com >>> welcome back to cnn. you're watching some pictures of the memorial for the victims of the terrorist attack one week ago today. almost to the minute. we'll be looking at -- we'll be watching the moment of silence. >> firefighter, first responders, paying their respects here as we're coming upon that moment, 2:50 p.m. eastern time, when those blasts went off. and this was the location for explosion number two, just a block from us, on boylston street. >> dzhokhar tsarnaev is in a hospital here in boston at this hour, under sedation, unable to speak, we're told, but he's been nodding and writing. as we have bee
are trusted employees of local businesses. those local businesses and those employees are returning tax dollars into the local economy. so when you're serving 50,000 people a year, when you're placing 2,000 people a year, that has a significant economic impact on our local communities. where do you see yourself in a year from now? what would you say, class? working.g. working. right. working. right. so, david, we're, we've talked a little bit about what are some of the challenges for people coming in. talk to us about what is working. what programs do you currently have that basically provide great opportunities for individuals who may have had a problem and, and are now in recovery? that's a great question. and the first thing we've discovered was that we didn't even know who had the problems before. so the first element is to do a much better assessment, screening, and to find out who has the problems. the second is, we have moved away from the continuum of approaches where you start out with treatment and you go to some education to having much more of an array of approaches. so a pe
, the obligatory annual tax on businesses. even though an amount goes to charitable causes, a portion by shoulsharia law is to go to jih. >> mike: marc, if you were giving us recommendations in the u.s., how to make our streets, cities safer, give us specific things that we're probably going to need to do. >> governor, picking up body parts, dealing with the scenes we saw in boston -- i was in boston just over a year ago, in the very same place, in fact, having a lunch. and these are the scenes that no one wants to deal with. this is the trauma. this is the -- the trauma that's going to stick with people forever. we need to understand a couple of things before we go into how to protect and be proactive. we need to understand that this is a scene that's going to cause many, many people for a long time a lot of trauma. the investigation, as claire correctly said, will lead to many trials, be a lot of speculation, until there's answers. the investigation is still going on. the boston police did an amazing job. the most important thing here is being proactive. there needs to be some form
. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can see it on yours, the program has exploded with companies advertising free phones, many of which come with more than 250 minutes of time, far more than needed for emergencies obviously. those supporters argue some need phones to find a job but the fcc told congress the top five providers can not verify the eligibility of 41% of those who get the phones. listen. >> i hear from law enforcement that these phones are often found at crime scenes and are used in drug deals. why? because you can't trace them. >> just handing out phones willy-nilly and allowing them to be sold on the black market, this isn't the way to do it and we need to stop. >> reporter: now some recipients famously called them obama phones. there is one supporter who boasted to media during the election that all minorities should support the president because he gave them free cell phones. some now propose expanding the free phone service to broadband but mccaskill says the current program is so far out of control we should scrap it and start over, not expand it.
to shift the nation to a smaller government with less regulation and taxes. now, that rattles folks like the editor-in-chief of the rap.com, a hollywood web site, who writes, quote: the koch brothers are known for having funneled multiple millions of dollars into right-wing political campaigns. this news should make anyone who cares about journalism nervous. well, i care about journalism, i'm not nervous. the chandler family founded the l.a. times in 1888 as a conservative newspaper, and never mind that no complaints were raised after reports that democratic billionaires ron burkle and ely broad were interested in buying "the new york times." there's that old saying that freedom of the press goes to the guy who owns one. the key point here isn't red or blue or politics, it's green -- money. tribune company just emerged from chapter 11, and while liberal pillars in hollywood are interested mainly in buying only the l.a. times, the koch brothers may bid to buy all eight tribune newspapers combined, and that could better insure their survival. liz? liz: well, yeah. to be fair and balanced,
to be repaid by fans buying seat licenses, corporate partnerships the 49ers and tax revenue. $240 million went to brick and mortar. they stress the project does remain on budget. >>> a very disappointing night for sharks fans. the team missed clinching a spot in the stanley cup play-offs tonight. here is a live look at the hp pavilion, where a turnover led to a late goal giving the columbus blue jackets a 4-3 victory over the sharks. fans haven't given up hope for the team to have a strong finish. >> heartbreaking. we came all the way from fresno to watch it. it was a great game. it was a great game. >> expectations? >> i'm expecting play-offs. i want a stanley cup in san jose. >> the sharks say they just have to regroup and get ready for the next game, which is tuesday against dallas. and that's going to be the sharks' last home game of the season. >> they'll clinch it then. >>> the water fountains in downtown san jose were popular with kids today and some adults. it's hot for this time of year, but it's not unbearable. it seems lick a lot of folks enjoyed the weather this afternoon. i did. >
like they are already getting money from taxes. they charge you for everything in the world. i think it's an added cost that is not necessary. >> they are messy. people throw them everywhere. they do plug stuff up. i would like it to be a little cleaner for my grand kids as they grow up. >> californian's reuse about 20 billion plastic bags every year. today some stores will hand out their bags for free. you keep your bags in the trunk and forget them so i ask people on facebook a very funny conversation going on about where people keep their bags. how they remember to bring their bags. >> after going in and having to pay because they are in the car i'm going to start remembering them now. >> right. maybe there is the incentive. >>> good morning, everybody. let's take a look at what we have now. we have a new crash in san francisco i want to mention. northbound 101 near the 280 interchange. one car hit the wall there. it's causing slow traffic coming up from near candle stick. let's go out and take a look at commute at the bay bridge toll plaza. westbound. you can see traffic is moving a
could be taking money from the schools or raising taxes. these technologies are not costless. they're not costless in terms of the budget or civil liberties. >> thank you for your time. greatly appreciate it. now more on the investigation and the aftermath. let me bring in congressman keith ellis, the first muslim elected to congress. first i'm sure you've heard the news that dzhokhar tsarnaev has been charged with using weapons of mass destruction in the boston marathon attacks. we're reading through the charges. learning more about what the fbi seized from his room. they described a large pyrotechnic, a black jacket and white cap. the big concern in addition to his brother's ties to any other outside groups, if there are any, is the question about the fbi. that the fbi questioned tamerlan tsarnaev and said that he was not a threat at the time. do you have any concerns with that information? >> well, you know, it is too early for me to second-guess the fbi. i think we need to know more about what they knew. the fact of the matter is that it is good that they contacted him. that wa
where you get this increase in volatility after tax time. and you see all the companies revising their earning forecast to temporary expectations. and so typically in the next month or two we'll have some external macro surprise that will get everyone concerned again. it's been a very consistent pattern that we do well in the fall and the early spring and then cool off and get more volatile. >> rick santelli, markets all waiting for these earnings reports this week. in the meantime among your markets, gold has bounced big today. the dollar is still flirting with 100 yen. what are you watching? what are the benchmarks you're keeping an eye on this week? >> well, you know what, i think the biggest benchmark that i'm going to pay attention to is the dax stock index in germany. it's down about 1.75% on the year. last week not only were eurozone car sales, registrations off, but germany was off in particular. i think keep it simple. i think as those auto numbers deteriorate, it's just going to exaggerate all the other weaker economies. and when you get the imf admitting that austerity
their representatives to vote against the marketplace fairness act which is an online sales tax. the biboys out there it would go after smaller merchants and hurt them. the stock market off to a mixed open. corporate earnings driving the way. we are going to get a report on existing home sales in the u.s. at 7 a.m. our time. right now the dow lower by 21 points. nasdaq heading higher by 6. s&p is trading flat. apple shares trying to rebound today, up about .75%. >> thank you, kcbs radio's financial reporter jason brooks. >>> time now for a look at what's coming up later on "cbs this morning." >> norah o'donnell is in the big chair today and joins us life in new york with more on the big show. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. ahead we have new information on what the fbi is learning from the boston bombing suspect under guard and awake at a hospital. also, we'll take you to russia where we're tracking down information about the suspect's past. gaves all a rare look at the dogs that serve u.s. special forces. this morning a decorated seal who trains many of those dogs will be here with us
responsibility? >> of course the company has a responsibility. i think what we see in texas is that taxes, you know, leads the nation in terms of numbers of worker fatalities, and i think that that is a consequence of not being diligent enough in terms of making sure that the facilities that are operating across the state are complying with the state and federal laws that are out there in existence. melissa: so, i mean, this is a problem that could touch anyone in our audience because in texas alone there are 1100 of these little local facilities, fertilizer that sell custom blends. this is all around the country. what is the bottom line on who you think should be responsible or who is responsible for making sure that they are in compliance and that the emergency response teams are not putting themselves in harm's way when they go in to try and help in the emergency situation? >> well, that's right. i think, you know, there are a number of things that could be done. for instance, the fact that a school and a rest home and hospital or all in very close proximity to the fertilizer plant, i think
this president even say the words "carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. ♪ >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation, on your radio, and on current tv. this is the "bill press show." >> bill: you know what you say up in boston three things matter, court, politics, and revenge. now is the time for a little revenge. good morning, everybody, what do you say? monday, monday april 22nd good to see you today. welcome, welcome welcome to the "full court press" here on current tv. it's a beautiful monday morning. little chilly in the air here in washington, d.c. otherwise a beautiful morning, itself good to see you today, hope you enjoyed the weekend and are ready to tackle the big stories of the day. things are kind of getting back to normal here in washington, d.c. we'll bring you up to date on the latest events up in boston, and the latest attempts to get someth
. >> investigators and taxes have not determined a cause of the explosion that killed 14 people including 10 first responders and a fertilizer plant in west texas. investigators say they pinpointed where the blast originated. the mpeg damaged or destroyed dozens of homes and businesses leaving hundreds of people homeless and in need of help. authorities have also released 91 tapes that captured the initial panic after the fire and massive blast. >> there was some type of explosion and our house, all of the windows are completely blocked and. the walls, part of it is blown off. >>, down and take a deep breath. we are aware of the situation and we are sending people out there as soon as we can. >> city leaders allowed some residents to return to their homes are the weekend but they still face strict curfews. fire officials will hold a memorial service at baylor university on thursday and honor of the volunteer firefighters who died. >> the boy scouts of america are proposing to partially lift its longtime ban on homosexuals. this proposal comes after weeks of private deliberation between the organiz
up at 9:20 today. >> internet sales tax, here it comes. huge new tax. >>brian: maybe take my advice and restructure that show of yours. you might want to think of that. >>steve: it is included as part of the mix. >>gretchen: he can do his radio show at the same time. >> fine promo, brian. >>gretchen: coming up on the show, he's the biggest baseball star in boston and his rallying cry not exactly p.g. for kids. should david ortiz -- should big papi get a pass? >>steve: eight jobs in eight years, and he never felt fulfilled. now he's got a new job. so what changed? the lessons you can learn from him and change your life. ♪ [ lighter flicking ] [ male announcer ] you've reached the age where giving up isn't who you are. ♪ this is the age of knowing how to make things happen. so, why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask your doctor if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing
,000 and 20,000 people left a lot of trash behind. since there was no organizer for the event, city tax payers have to pay for it. >> big bucks there. >>> a warm start to the week but how long will it last. steve paulson will tell us when to expect a cooldown. >>> and check this out. a young boy a very horrifying close call with an alligator. we'll tell you how he was able to survive. >>> it looks like we have some slowing on southbound 101. this may be due to an earlier crash near candlestick. we'll give you the update straight ahead. [ male announcer ] enjoy delicious chicken made the way you say at subwa. with our oven roasted chicken, now a $3 six-inch select. make it your own with melty monterey cheddar or creamy ranch. and during april, the black forest ham is also a $3 six-inch select. subway. eat fresh. >>> a south florida boy is lucky to be alive after he was attacked by an alligator. he and his father planned to go canoeing off boynton beach. he wandered to the edge and an alligator bit on the right side of his body. >> grabbed my arm. i couldn't get out. >> i'll punching the alligat
portfolio. tax efficient and low cost building blocks to help you keep more of what you earn. call your advisor. visit ishares.com. ishares. yeah, ishares. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. >>> morni
for internet sales to collect sales tax. >>> and the "washington post" says investors are pouring more money. some wealthy buyers make up 70% of sales. >>> all right. weather looking good around the bay area. nice sunny start to the day to the coastline. the temperatures staying fairly mild in some spots. in the upper 50s already in some areas. 57 degrees in oakland. 57 in vallejo. 57 degrees in san francisco. this afternoon sunshine to the coast.60s evenat th 70s inside the bay and 90 degrees inland in the warmest spots. next couple of days starting to cool down fog returning by wednesday. >> announcer: this national weather report sponsored by the big wedding starring robert d dinero katherine heigl and diane keeton in theaters friday. >>> two police officers were guthe manhunt more the marathon bombers. one gave his life. the other nearly lost his. this morning the friends who became heroes. >>> a legal battle is already brewing over the surviving suspect. should he be treated as an enemy combatant. >>> and a historic tragedy in the rockies. >> i figured,
price dropped 11 cents over the last two weeks. >>> the senate could allow states to tax internet purchases adding $11 billion to state coffers and wall street gets back to work after the dow's worst weekly decline since june. back to you. >> mary, thanks. >>> in great britain, the duchess of cambridge, kate middleton appeared in public on sunday with her pregnancy more evident than ever. she stood in for queen elizabeth at a review of scouts while the queen celebrated her 87th birthday in private. the duchess and prince william are expecting the first child this summer. for those who are on royal baby bump watch -- if you have been living under a rock, did you know. >> when you said her name i perked up and i wanted to see bump. >> she looks beautiful. >> certainly does. >> mr. roker has more on the midwest flooding an the local forecast. >> not a lot of good news for friends in the midwest and winter won't let go. we have a funnel system. behind it a lot of cold air and snow for the upper midwest and the plains. ahead of it, a lot of wet weather. we are looking from sheridan up
tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so that every year we're repairing, replacing the right things, and we don't have to do it all at once, which is,
clients are working poor. they pay their taxes. they may run into a rough patch now and then and what we're able to provide is a bridge towards getting them back on their feet. the center averages about 14,000 visits a year in the health clinic alone. one of the areas that we specialize in is family medicine, but the additional focus of that is is to provide care to women and children. women find out they're pregnant, we talk to them about the importance of getting good prenatal care which takes many visits. we initially will see them for their full physical to determine their base line health, and then enroll them in prenatal care which occurs over the next 9 months. group prenatal care is designed to give women the opportunity to bond during their pregnancy with other women that have similar due dates. our doctors here are family doctors. they are able to help these women deliver their babies at the hospital, at general hospital. we also have the wic program, which is a program that provides food vouchers for our families after they have their children, up to age 5 they are able to rec
and then eliminate the deficit through two ways. one is increasing the amount of revenue coming through tax policy, or reduce the amount of expenditures by cutting back on expenses and spending or some combination of those two. i believe that the most credible way is through what we call a balanced approach. >> john boehner, republican speaker of the house, emphasizes that spending cuts are the most important and effective way to solve the debt problem. >> republicans want to solve this problem by getting the spending line down. the chart depict what i have said for long time. washington has a spending probleatixed withax incaseslone. he wants to keep chasing higher spending with higher taxes. this chart will look a lot worse. our kids and our grandkids are the ones who are going to because washington was too shortsighted to fix the problem. >> the younger generation will suffer from this issue in the future. >> if we don't solve the national debt problem, eventually they're going to cut more government services, and one of the cuts will be education. >> we should invest in education. it has to be
to defend soviet totalitarianism. they don't have the same thing for paying taxes for the education of its college students today. one of the kingpins of hollywood mourned behind the scenes he seemed to lend solace time -- what were his lanning as? was he left, right, what were his politics? he was eventually a man devoted to the welfare of universal pictures. that's what he did, that's how he definedit seems t me thatase. so long as work to the benefit his studio and enterprise and was a vast enterprise but it reached full maturity. i don't think he was an evil man is no my mind a guy tending toy he was the leading entrepreneur of hollywood and he was the man people went to to settle disputes and problems and he was notoriously fairly honest broker he's a fascinating man and there's a tendency with people of great power and motion picture business there is a tendency to kind of step back and kind of fear, but i think in the largest sense he was an honest broker and there are not that many of them in the industry ever so i don't think we will know the full extent what he was doing, what h
Search Results 65 to 92 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)